bootslots:

i was watching Phineas & Ferb and then did they just reference Rocky Horror oh my stars and stripes they did

Fun Fact: Did you know the voice of Mr. Fletcher in Phineas & Ferb is the guy who wrote Rocky Horror beCAUSE I SURE DIDN’T

WHAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAT.

A Clitoris is actually an undeveloped penis; since we all, at some point, are both male and female in the uterus, before the dominate gene takes over, the penis on a female and a male is actually the same. And once the dominate gene takes over for a male, the clit actually develops into a penis, so technically, when a girl says: suck my dick… I guess it’s kinda politically correct…

sarahcabello:

dracoyoulittlepoofer:

the-angels-have-sherlock:

badwolf221bbakerstreet:

itsdauntlessbitch:

magicxmissile:

sodamnrelatable:

image

That’s also why guys have nipples. 

wow i actually didn’t know that

I…what.

SCIENCE

fun fact.

So guys were girls at one point.

Guys came from girls

Yeah all the time

Remember this guys, before you were a dick… You were a chick

oh my god. i cant stop laughing

owlmylove:

avvadakedavvra:

disneyprincessdreams:

anniephantom:

why doesn’t disneyworld have a kuzcotopia

image

Because they would have to destroy the homes of the locals to make room for it

that hasnt stopped any corporations before

#SHOTS FIRED

unknownskywalker:

Stellar explosions in NGC 6984
Supernovae are intensely bright objects. They are formed when a star reaches the end of its life with a dramatic explosion, expelling most of its material out into space. The subject of this new Hubble image, spiral galaxy NGC 6984, played host to one of these explosions back in 2012, known as SN 2012im. Now, another star has exploded, forming supernova SN 2013ek — visible in this image as the prominent, star-like bright object just slightly above and to the left of the galaxy’s centre.

unknownskywalker:

Stellar explosions in NGC 6984

Supernovae are intensely bright objects. They are formed when a star reaches the end of its life with a dramatic explosion, expelling most of its material out into space. The subject of this new Hubble image, spiral galaxy NGC 6984, played host to one of these explosions back in 2012, known as SN 2012im. Now, another star has exploded, forming supernova SN 2013ek — visible in this image as the prominent, star-like bright object just slightly above and to the left of the galaxy’s centre.

fussyfangss:

do you ever just scroll through your dash reblogging everything like
“damn you guys are on fire tonight”

Yesterday I posted about wondering if it was time to close this blog…

    …And after giving it some thought, I’ve decided that yes, it’s time.

    Believe me, this wasn’t a snap decision by any means — I’ve actually been thinking it over for a couple of months, now.  Part of the reason I took that hiatus back in September was not only to take a break, but also to reassess what I was doing and where I was going.  That which I had hoped would be a serious blogging venture turned out to be something quite unexpected — and not always in a good way.

    In the end, it came down to something that my parents had always taught me: the minute that something stops being fun, that’s the minute you know you ought to stop.

    This blog, which I did have some pretty high hopes for when I first got started, was beginning to feel less like something to be enjoyed and more like a chore that required a certain level of maintenance and upkeep.  While that seems to be true with any blog or online forum regardless of its focus, I came to realize just how tired I was becoming of it all.

    In short, I was no longer enjoying myself — even though I have met SO MANY PEOPLE that have made me want to stick it out as long as possible.

    Believe me, a whole bunch of you were the reason I teetered on this for as long as I have.  Without you, I don’t think I would have kept giving it shot after shot.

    As much as I have come to realize that it’s now time to close this blog and put this chapter to rest, I don’t necessarily want to close the relationships that it helped me start.

    There are, in fact, many of you that I would truly like to keep in touch with — so if any of you would like, please get in contact with me, and I’ll let you know where else I tend to lurk online.  

    If I decide to launch a different blog on Tumblr, possibly about January or so, you’ll be the first to know.

    Feel free to drop by and give a shout-out.  I’ll keep my ears open as long as possible for you.

    For the moment, though…I’m going to let the que run itself out, whereupon Sunday will be the last day for posts here on this little island of mine.  It’s had a good run.  Now it’s time to move on.

    Thanks so much, everyone.

    Stay tuned!

queer-punk:

gettingahealthybody:

trilliansthoughts:

This miniature ecosystem has been thriving in an almost completely isolated state for more than forty years. It has been watered just once in that time.The original single spiderwort plant has grown and multiplied, putting out seedlings. As it has access to light, it continues to photosynthesize. The water builds up on the inside of the bottle and then rains back down on the plants in a miniature version of the water cycle.
As leaves die, they fall off and rot at the bottom producing the carbon dioxide and nutrients required for more plants to grow.

Amazing.

SCIENCE

queer-punk:

gettingahealthybody:

trilliansthoughts:

This miniature ecosystem has been thriving in an almost completely isolated state for more than forty years. It has been watered just once in that time.

The original single spiderwort plant has grown and multiplied, putting out seedlings. As it has access to light, it continues to photosynthesize. The water builds up on the inside of the bottle and then rains back down on the plants in a miniature version of the water cycle.

As leaves die, they fall off and rot at the bottom producing the carbon dioxide and nutrients required for more plants to grow.

Amazing.

SCIENCE

ladyshinga:

When I was young, adulthood seemed like this totally badass cool mature thing. Now I just really want to eat cake for breakfast and watch cartoons whenever I want.
http://headtrip.keenspot.com/d/20131104.html

ladyshinga:

When I was young, adulthood seemed like this totally badass cool mature thing. Now I just really want to eat cake for breakfast and watch cartoons whenever I want.

http://headtrip.keenspot.com/d/20131104.html

sailorsunburst:

askwilliamcarter:

this-island-of-misfit-toys:

beahbeah:

confuzzeldmind:

WHOEVER BUYS THIS FOR ME WINS MY ETERNAL LOVE

I OWN THIS
EVERY MORNING HE SAYS SOMETHING DIFFERENT ABOUT HOW THE WORLD NEEDS YOU AND YOU HAVE TO GET UP
AND WHEN YOU PRESS THE BUTTON TO HUSH HIM HE SAYS “DEFTLY DONE, MADAM,” OR “IF IT’S NOT TOO FORWARD OF ME, THAT DID TICKLE, MADAM”
IT WAKES YOU UP WITH THE SOUND OF CHIRPING BIRDS BEFORE STEPHEN FRY’S VOICE
EVERYONE SHOULD HAVE ONE

Good Lord I hope one of my irl friends sees this because ffs I need this.

….. I want one. But with Maxwell yelling at me to get up.

GET ME THIS

sailorsunburst:

askwilliamcarter:

this-island-of-misfit-toys:

beahbeah:

confuzzeldmind:

WHOEVER BUYS THIS FOR ME WINS MY ETERNAL LOVE

I OWN THIS

EVERY MORNING HE SAYS SOMETHING DIFFERENT ABOUT HOW THE WORLD NEEDS YOU AND YOU HAVE TO GET UP

AND WHEN YOU PRESS THE BUTTON TO HUSH HIM HE SAYS “DEFTLY DONE, MADAM,” OR “IF IT’S NOT TOO FORWARD OF ME, THAT DID TICKLE, MADAM”

IT WAKES YOU UP WITH THE SOUND OF CHIRPING BIRDS BEFORE STEPHEN FRY’S VOICE

EVERYONE SHOULD HAVE ONE

Good Lord I hope one of my irl friends sees this because ffs I need this.

….. I want one. But with Maxwell yelling at me to get up.

GET ME THIS

    My daughter Poesy is only four years old, and she can’t read or do complex sums yet, so when I decided to start playing D&D with her, I knew I’d need to come up with a super-streamlined set of rules that could hold her attention and enable the kind of imaginative play she excels at already.

    Poesy loves to roleplay. Give her a couple of stuffed toys or figurines of any description and she’ll invent complex scenarios for them, roping in any handy and willing grownups to play opposite her characters, sometimes demanding that we come up with our own scenarios to play out. I’d intuited that this wasn’t so different from the D&D games I grew up playing – though I’d been numerate and literate for some years before I started.

    I happened upon a set of factory-painted plastic D&D minis while looking for a toy to bring home in the dealer’s room at a regional science fiction convention in Chicago. After marveling at the astounding advances in robotic toy-painting, I had a brain-flash. A minute later, I’d bought a handsome dice-bag and filled it with a dozen assorted figs and a set of polyhedral dice.

    After I got home to London, I performed the ancient ritual of unpacking the souvenirs I’d brought home for the kid. As I’d hoped, she was captivated by the intricate painting on the figs and the jewel-like facets of the dice, and demanded that we play right now.

    Poesy has a piggy bank full of the small change she’s picked up or appropriated from us over the years, and I dumped it out and sorted out the different denominations. Once that was done, I used our Ikea playmat (which has a street-scape laid out on it), some cushions, a shoebox, and a cardboard doll-castle to set up a town, a cave, and a castle.

    I put all the “bad-guy” minis on strategic spots on the castle, and stuck one of Poesy’s stuffed toys – a winged hamster she calls “Fairy Hamster” – in the middle of its courtyard. I gave her two minis to play, and set them down on the playmat’s ice-cream parlor, declaring this to be the “tavern.” I put two more bad-ass-looking figs next to them, and declared them to be my NPCs.

    I improvised a very quick background. My NPCs are in the tavern, planning to rescue their friend the Fairy Hamster, who is being held hostage in Castle Doom. Did Poesy’s characters want to help? They sure did!

    I rolled up the mat while talking about the party’s long walk in the woods, then set out the party’s figs in the vicinity of the “cave,” (the shoebox) on the “hill” (the cushion). My NPCs made some suggestions for besieging the castle. I had an archer and a magic-user (M-U), and Poesy had a fighter and a magic-user of her own. We brainstormed out a mix of ranged attacks and melee, and went to town.

    I gave the party the initiative for the first turn. Poesy rolled dice for movement for each of her characters. The elf magic-user got a d6, the armored fighter got a d4, the totals corresponding to the distance in inches on our living-room floor (we used a tape-measure). Poesy didn’t get immediately that this meant that on average the M-U was going to be faster than the fighter, but she caught on very quickly.

    Once the party got in range of the castle’s defenders, we started combat. Each party-member paired with a defender and launched an attack. The M-Us got to choose between magic missile and fireball. I explained that magic missile was harder to hit with, but did more damage than fireball. We used a D20, and I required Poesy to roll higher than the number of inches between her fig and the defender she was aiming for for fireball. For magic missile, we used the same system, but subtracted two from her roll (this being the most complex subtraction she can do in her head).

    The first time any of the characters got hit, we generated their hit-points (in other words, we rolled the characters’ stats as they were required, rather than rolling them in advance). I wanted Poesy to be able to keep track of the hit-points herself, which let out pen and paper scorekeeping. Instead, we rolled a d8 for each character’s hit-points, and took that many coins out of her piggy-bank and stacked them up next to each mini. When characters sustained damage (a d4 for fireball, a d6 for magic missile or arrow, a d8 for a sword), Poesy took that many coins out of each character’s pile. By varying the type of coin we used for each character – one got pennies, another was marked with 2p pieces, or 5p or 10p, etc) – we made it easy to sort out whose HPs were who’s when they were (inevitably) knocked over. I decreed that all the magic users could cast healing spells instead of attacks, each doing 1d4’s worth of restoration.

    So, this turned out to be a lot of fun. The longer we played, the more we improvised. At one point, I grabbed a glass sphere sculpture from a shelf and told Poesy it was a “crystal ball” that the M-U could use to direct the archer’s arrows, skipping an attack to give the archer an automatic hit. Poesy loved this, and really got into the roleplaying, “coming to the rescue” of other characters by healing them or helping them with aimhacks. By the time we’d liberated the Fairy Hamster, she was hooked.

    We continue to play, about once a month, always with a different campaign improvised from whatever is lying around at the time. By getting straight into the story and going quickly to the combat (or trap-springing, puzzle-solving, or what-have-you), and by saving the character-rolling until it’s needed, I’m able to tailor the experience to the attention-span of a four-year-old. Our games last about 45 minutes, and they’re very kinetic, with a lot of jumping around, crawling on the floor, and so on.

    She’s recently leveled up in the drawing and coloring department, so my next project will be to get her started on miniatures painting. I imagine that our games will be that much more fun once she’s playing characters she “made” herself.

    In the meantime, we’ve got another activity in our daddy-daughter repertoire, a nice break from playing “school” and the other “realistic” imaginative games we usually play. There’s certainly also some sneaky basic math skills acquisition going on too, but that’s beside the point: we play for fun, and Poesy would spot it a mile away if I switched to a game that was “good for her.”

DMing for your toddler - Illustration by Jim Wampler and Hanae Ko

    Literally, the only reason I’m posting this is because I have a friend whose parents DM’ed for her and her sister way back in the day, and now that she has a little girl of her own…yeah.  I thought of them instantly as I was reading through this — even though I suspect that she will wait until her kids are old enough to fill out character sheets before she breaks out the old playbooks and proceeds to show them how it’s done old-school.